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Massachusetts General Hospital (“MGH”) treated its first patient on ProTom International’s Radiance 330® Proton Therapy System (the “Radiance 330”) at the Gordon-Browne Proton Therapy Center, prior to the pandemic, in February of 2020. The Radiance 330 at MGH is a compact, single-room system equipped with an advanced pencil beam scanning system, integrated imaging and workflow driven control system.

Veterans in the field of radiation oncology have long recognized the contributions of Massachusetts General Hospital to the present- day understanding of utilizing proton beam therapy to treat patients for cancer and other diseases. Patients travel from all over the world to receive this specialized treatment at MGH.

In order to increase treatment capacity and remain on the forefront of ever‐changing technology, ProTom’s Radiance 330 was selected by MGH to meet these requirements by providing cancer patients greater access to precision medical techniques from scanned‐beam proton therapy with integrated imaging.

The Radiance 330 was installed inside a radiation-shielded vault (formerly two linac vaults), embedded three levels below ground and with ten floors above, within the existing and operational Radiation Oncology Department of MGH — a solution that enables the facility to share clinical staff, ancillary equipment and patient support areas.  Adapting this unique technology to the space and occupancy constraints of the operational clinical facility is possible, partially due to the lower neutron emissions of the Radiance 330’s synchrotron accelerator. The lighter-weight, compact technology simplifies the installation process for the 180-degree gantry which requires no special road transport, facility hatch, or external cranes and can be moved in through typical freight or staff entrances.

The model shows the path (green) for Radiance 330 installation in the vault (orange) – from the freight dock down the elevator shaft and through typical hospital corridors into the embedded proton therapy suite.

The story behind the scene

MGH presented a challenge – to install the Radiance 330 in a smaller than usual space, below ground, within an active clinical setting in the Lunder building, which is one of the busiest buildings at the one of the busiest hospitals in the United States. The only way to get the system components down to the vault was through the lift shaft and down typical hospital corridors. The space available to install Radiance 330 is extremely constrained, and many of those challenges we were facing were not predictable.

Engineers performing a final check on the gantry.

As one of the best hospitals globally, MGH is well-known for not only outstanding medical technology, but also for meticulous patient care. A requirement for this installation was to not disrupt ongoing patient treatment or any other hospital activity. Fortunately, the lightweight, compact, modular design of the Radiance 330 eliminates the
need for heavy equipment in the delivery, construction, and the installation phases.  ProTom’s well-trained team was able to overcome all challenges and make a successful installation.

ProTom fully understood the difficulties and magnitude of this installation. After dozens of meetings with hospital teams, the company made a solid plan and a very flexible schedule to work onsite. During installation and testing, there were usually three shifts per day to maximize the working efficiency and system utilization. In-building transport only occurred at “hospital quiet hours”; ProTom transported components through the hospital corridors and the staff entrances, and “squeezed” those large parts into the elevator shaft.  Engineers and physicists worked around the clock to complete the installation. Installation and testing were completed without halting patient treatment in the adjoining radiation oncology linear accelerator treatment room.

ProTom team slides a large piece of system into elevator shaft.   

The compact and lightweight synchrotron accelerator is easily moved into place and assembled on-site in a matter of weeks.

The compact and lightweight synchrotron accelerator is easily moved into place and assembled on-site in a matter of weeks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louis P. Wainwright, Chief Operating Officer, commented: “It was a challenging project due not only to the usual complexity of a proton therapy system, but because of the unique space and access restrictions. Everyone in the company was fully committed to this project and was excited to prove that it was a wise choice to select the Radiance 330, among the most advanced and compact proton therapy systems in the world.”

Stephen L. Spotts, Chief Executive Officer of ProTom, commented: “It is with great pride that we offer congratulations to MGH and its Radiation Oncology Department leaders and staff for treating the first patient using our Radiance 330 at the new Gordon Browne Proton Center.

This achievement is the culmination of years of design and development and accelerates ProTom’s mission to place this highly sophisticated technology within reach of many more hospitals and physicians.  Our team couldn’t be prouder of reaching this milestone.  We thank MGH, our partners and suppliers for their confidence and support throughout this project.  We also extend immense gratitude to our team of clinical, engineering, and technical employees whose focus, perseverance, and dedication led us in this successful endeavor.”

About ProTom International

ProTom International is a leading device manufacturer of proton therapy technology. We are steadfast in our mission to transform cancer treatment by expanding the accessibility of proton therapy and by developing proton tomography technology.

Combined with rapid return on investment and the precision of pencil beam scanning and the power of integrated imaging, ProTom’s Radiance 330 is the choice for future proton therapy technology.

 

 

For further information, please visit: https://www.protominternational.com

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For related news from MGH, please visit: https://gray.mgh.harvard.edu/66-news-and-events/news/325-first-treatment-at-new-gordon-brown-proton-center